Egg Basics

Egg Basics



Buying Eggs

  • You want to use the freshest eggs possible, but that’s easier said than
    done, thanks to a confusing and meaningless labeling system. Try to find locally raised eggs if you can. Whichever you choose, look for the sell-by date; it should be at least a couple weeks in the future.
  • Buy only large or extra-large eggs, since the recipes in this book (and most others) work best with those sizes. Once you get eggs home, leave them in the carton and put them in the coolest part of the fridg —usually the bottom, in the back. (Don’t store them in those cute little cups in the door.) You can tell how good they are when you crack one open: A really fresh egg will have a firm yolk that sits high on a mound of whites. If it’s runny and thin, with a flat yolk, it’s a little on the old side; you can still eat it, though, unless it smells bad.
  • To keep bits of shell from getting into the part you eat, open an egg by smacking the side definitively—but not aggressively—on a flat, hard surface, stopping your hand when you hear a crack.
  • Most of what’s inside an egg is the white, which contains more than half of the egg’s protein and none of its fat. The yolk has the majority of the vitamins and the remaining protein and minerals. Don’t freak out if you see a small blood spot in the yolk; you’ll never notice it once the egg is cooked. If it bugs you, remove it with the tip of a sharp knife.

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